When to Put in Effort in your Fast Bowling. It's Not All the Time.

This is a guest article from former professional bowler, and current Strength, Conditioning and Fast Bowling Coach Steffan Jones.

Go easy on the hard work.

The only way to improve your fitness, pace and stamina is by stressing the body to the limit. You have to train hard. However, the body can only tolerate so much. Flat out effort is draining.

So how do you train and play hard without breaking yourself? Read on to find out.

Get a Grip: Forearm Training Leads to More Runs

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Stronger forearms give more power in your shots and the ability to go on and on.

But a few wrist curls at the end of the workout like a bodybuilder doesn't cut it. For batsmen who want to score runs, isometric grip training – rather than growing your forearms - holds more importance. This is because flexing and extending your wrist with added resistance will do precious little for increasing cricket-specific grip strength.

So, why do you need a stronger grip to bat?

It starts a virtuous circle.

How Stress Can Make or Break Your Ability to Bowl Fast

This is a guest article from Strength Coach, Fast Bowling Coach and Former First-Class Cricketer, Steffan Jones.

If a fast bowler isn't being physically stressed, you're wasting your time.

Stop Doing Laps, Start Taking Wickets

 Wouldn't you like to know a way to get miles in your legs without 10 rounds of the ground?

While, most ex-cricketers and coaches will tell you that stamina is good for bowlers, a long jog just isn’t the way to do it. Long jogs are sure recipes for disaster.

Still sceptical? Have a look at the stats.

How to Train if You Are Unhappy with How Fast You Bowl

This is a guest article from former professional bowler, and current Strength, Conditioning and Fast Bowling Coach Steffan Jones.

How do you train to bowl lightning fast?

Sorry to all the traditionalist out there, but you can't "just bowl". Not if you want real pace.

Neither can you expect to do endless conditioning session that don't replicate the energy systems and effort of bowling. The sessions I'm seeing in some indoor schools and gyms are great for any other sports but not fast bowling!

So what do we do?

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Who Knew it Could be Fun Warming Up for Cricket?

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Let's be frank, warming up is boring.

Essential for injury prevention yes, but it's not the reason you picked up a bat and ball. So if we can come up with ways to make warming up both fun and functional, we are winning at life. And if there is one coach who knows his way around fun and function, it's Iain Brunnschweiler; author of the Inspired Cricket Manual.

Here's an example of what we mean:

What Fast Bowling Science Boffins Tell You About Preventing Injury

Dr. Deepak Hiwale is "The Fitness Doc", a medical doctor, sports scientist and cricket lover with a special interest in preventing fast bowling injuries. In this article, The Doc tells us about the pitfalls of bowling fast, and how you can stay on the park.

Fast bowlers have always been thought of as unintelligent by batsmen. However, nothing can be further from the truth. Fast bowling an intelligent art but it is also downright hard work. What's more is that more intelligence and planning go into the making of a fast bowler compared to a cricketer with other skill sets.

This intelligence and planning is not only to make a fast bowler but to also increase his shelf life.

The Road to 90mph Bowling from the Man Who Made It

This is part 3 of and autobiographical training guide Steffan Jones, professional fast bowler. Can he achieve his aim of reaching 90mph through innovative training methods? For part one click here, for part 4 click here.

The Story of Bowling Fast Continues Here

In part one of this autobiographical training guide Steffan Jones, professional fast bowler, told us how he discovered the power of strength training to bowl faster. But he was about to take things to another level. Here is what happened in 1999...

The winter of 1999 in preparation for 2000 English season was my first attempt at training specifically for cricket. This is the winter where I began to take things seriously. I began to research more on performance training and spent hundreds of pounds on training books.

At the time I was bowling 78mph. I was hoping to add a yard onto my bowling.

During the winter I followed a basic weight training program. It was nothing intense, simple basic training focusing on body parts. The gym facility we had at the time was machine based so athletic training wasn’t really possible.

Yet, I still managed to increase my pace.

How?

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