Psychology | Cricket coaching, fitness and tips

The performance paradox: Why being a better cricketer is about more than cricket

More cricket and more training is not the fastest route to cricket success.

It's easy to think so at first glance. We already know that it takes around 10,000 hours to achieve mastery of any cricket skill. The simple maths is that the more hours you log the faster you improve. That logic is sound but it's far from the whole story.

Technique or mental strength: What's more important?

Modern cricket has almost torn up the coaching book.

'The Map' Part 5: How to recover quickly from one game to the next

Your post-match routine is another area where developing simple routines can be beneficial.

At the end of any contest there is the desire to relax, celebrate perhaps, reflect on performances and identify ‘what went wrong’.

In order to make this period as productive as possible you can employ:

Physical Recovery Routines

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Cruise control: Building mental toughness is about more than hard work

This PitchVision Academy members only article can be read as a standalone piece but if you really want to act on it, use it in conjunction with the "How to use mental training to boost your game" course.

There is a famous saying that doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results is a sign of madness.

Snow day: 6 Ways to train when the weather puts a stop to things

As you can see from the picture, I went to my gym here in the UK to find it shut with a snowman in the carpark.

That put an end to my plans to train that day. Or did it?

'The Map' part 4: How to stay focused on playing the game

There is a large mental side to cricket and it is often our thinking that gets us out or stops us bowling well.

There are a lot of distractions going on through the course of a game: In the middle, waiting to bat, waiting to field, taking lunch, tea or a drinks break. What is required is a set of routines or processes you can employ, almost without thinking, that will allow you more time and ‘brain space’ to focus on playing the game as well as possible.

'The Map' part 3: What should I do the night before a game?

Parts 1 and 2 of this series dealt with Practice Routines and Non-Practice Training Routines that a player should develop as part of a ‘Map for Cricket Success’.

This article will deal with your ‘Game Eve Routines’.

'The Map' part 2: Developing non-practice training routines

Every player can benefit from developing their own set of routines and processes to help them prepare and play successfully. 

In the first installment of this series, I dealt with developing routines to be employed during batting, bowling and fielding practice. 

How to adopt the killer instinct in your cricket club (part 2)

This is part two of a two part series. To go to part one click here.

In the last part of these series we found out why a killer instinct is critical to your clubs success whatever level you are at. Today we look at the three ways you can do it as a captain or player.

1. Keep wickets at the front of your mind