Psychology | Cricket coaching, fitness and tips

How to Stop Rain Getting You Down

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How true does this situation sound?

You are ready for a game. You have prepared hard and long. You are keen to put yourself to the test, have some fun and enjoy the challenge. The anticipation is wonderful.

Then it rains.

Bat With a Clear Mind? Yes, But Not Too Clear

How much of batting is mental?

How Christmas Pantomime Can Improve Your Cricket

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Good sporting performance is a lot like acting in a British Panto.

Oh yes it is.

Train Your Mind for Cricket with the 4C Method

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Most of us know what do do with a technical issue: Get in the nets and fix it. We also know that to get fit you train with cricket specific fitness work. But what if you want to improve the mental side of your game?

Look the Part: How Your Image Makes You a Better Cricketer

Here's an inconvenient truth: Your image is important to your cricket.

Naturally, results always come first. It doesn't matter what you look like if you are scoring hundreds then bowling out the opposition top six before catching the rest at slip. But if want a chance, you absolutely have to "look and act the part".

How to Become a High-Class Spin Bowler: A Complete Masterplan

What goes into becoming an excellent spinner? It's a question raised recently by this article looking at what England need to do to improve their spin stock. What can you learn from these ideas to take into your spin bowling?

How to Bowl Perfect Line and Length

Let me ask you something; how much better a bowler would you be if you could hit a perfect line and length?

It's a challenge that takes a lifetime to master, and a road that is littered with distractions.

Embrace the Bumpy Road to Develop Cricketers

I have regular conversations with parents and players about their cricket development (or lack of it). Some of those conversations are instigated by the parent or the player yet I would say that over 70% are arranged by the coaching staff at Millfield.

Failure is Good: How to Use Your Cricket Mistakes Positively

As a cricketer, success is easy to see: Runs, wickets and victories. If you fail you have done badly. And while winning is the ultimate point, the way to get there is by embracing your failures.

We all fail. Perfection is impossible. What is possible is how you react to the failure. You can learn from your mistakes and become a stronger player because of the failure. In fact, this method is so powerful that really good players build failure into their training deliberately. Rather than avoiding errors, they are embracing it as a way to free themselves from the tyranny of achieving perfection.

How to Captain: Placing the Fielders

This is part three of a series on how to captain in the field. To go to part one click here. To go back to the introduction click here.

Along with bowling changes, field placing is the other obvious part of captaincy in the field.

The simple way to look at it is to put the fielders where you think the ball is most likely to go (not always just where it has gone).

How do you do that without resorting to the stock fields that everyone uses?

Before we get into that, a word about orthodox fields: They are orthodox because they have been proven to work over the test of time. Slips remain in place because batsmen through the ages continue to edge the ball wide of the wicketkeeper. Mid on and mid off exist because even the most extreme Twenty20 specialists play shots with a straight bat sometimes.

That said it's important not to mindlessly follow what you consider the norm. Just because every captain in your club starts the game with a couple of slips, a gulley and a saving one field it does not mean you should.

For the basic theory of field placing take a look at my article here.

Once you have that in your mind, let's go back to the basic aim of field placing: Putting your players where you think the ball will go.